Some time ‘off farm’

Harvest hi jinx Part 1
November 30, 2014
Ex’seed’ingly dry…
May 10, 2015

To be honest I really can’t put my finger on why it is taken so long for me to write this post although I have come up with several theories.

My first one revolved around the fact I had almost a month off work and having had a ‘Mo/No’vember (combination of growing, well trying to at least, a moustache and drinking ‘No’ alcohol for the month) it would be fair to say I spent the following 4 weeks in a mildly inebriated state during which writing my name would have been a struggle much less penning this blog.

The fact we did a bit of travelling around is a more innocent and probably more accurate reason as to why I have neglected DOAFH for this long as we spent time in Perth, Kalbarri and a very memorable couple of nights in Port Gregory with our good friends Sam and Tim Hay who run the caravan park there. While I will explore in a bit more detail some of the goings on during this time, which by way of a preview included a memorable fishing trip with KK and Kissa, I will move onto what I think is the real reason for my two month writer’s block.

It was at a good friend’s 50th that Wifey and I found ourselves in a very interesting conversation with a couple who farm an adjoining property to Mulga Springs. As you would expect we were talking about what kind of year it had been on the respective properties and the simple fact that when you farm it is an all consuming and often overwhelming undertaking that at times leaves you with nowhere to hide and no option to get away from it all when things aren’t going to plan.

This exchange got me thinking about sayings like “you shouldn’t bring your work home with you” and “as soon as I leave the office I shut off from work” and that anyone invested in a farming business whether it is financially, emotionally or physically rarely gets the chance to put enough distance between them and their property to wind down sufficiently to really relax. You quite literally ‘live the business’ when you are in farming and if I am to be honest this to my mind is the real reason I haven’t blogged for over two months as for the first time since I met Wifey I needed a break from Mulga Springs.

Now those of you who know me are probably thinking “Is he serious, he doesn’t spend that much time working on the farm” and you would be absolutely right however Wifey does spend that much time working at Mulga Springs and as all the farmer’s wives out there can attest to there does come a point when you can see your family needs to physically remove themselves to unwind and recharge the batteries even if it is just for a few days.

In our part of the world it is places like Port Gregory, Kalbarri or my personal favourite Horrocks that offer solace to farming families through late December and January. We are fortunate to have the use of Kissa and MIL’s camp in Horrocks which over the years has been the venue for some cracking New Year’s Eves and more recently very special family gatherings with ZASH and their cousins.

I on occasion tell the story that while I was certain I would marry Wifey soon after meeting her my first visit to Horrocks and the family’s ‘beach camp’ (which is inactual fact a very serviceable 2x1chalet) sealed the deal.Idyllic when there is no wind and with that perpetual holiday atmosphere which makes it ok to open a beer at anytime of the day it is probably the only place (other than the header when the crop is going 3 tonne*) that I see Kissa totally relaxed.

While there is a school of thought that with so many farmers congregating in Horrocks surely the only thing discussed is farming however I can tell you that is not the case. In my experience it remains the most conducive location to bring the conversation away from the farm due quite simply to the fact you are not able to see the fence line you have been meaning to fix or the two mobs of sheep you were going to move to better pasture.

I mentioned earlier that I spent a reasonable amount of my holiday partaking in some social ales around the place and while Wifey achieved nowhere near my level of consumption there were some occasions where Rins performed admirably her second most important role (other than looking after ZCP and ASH) of driving us home. Now I thought this would be viewed as quite a mundane task for our super efficient, effervescent 18 y.o. although apparently not according to our ever positive uber au pair who insisted Wifey sledge me mercilessly whenever I started singing along to the radio, most notably the cover of the Bob Geldof inspired “Do they know it’s Christmas?” was highly entertaining.

* 3 tonnes of crop harvested from every hectare seeded

Owing to the fact if I don’t post this now I probably never will I’ll let the photo gallery tell the story of our last couple of months.

Picture

Movember with ZCP (pathetic effort I know)

To be honest I really can’t put my finger on why it is taken so long for me to write this post although I have come up with several theories.

My first one revolved around the fact I had almost a month off work and having had a ‘Mo/No’vember (combination of growing, well trying to at least, a moustache and drinking ‘No’ alcohol for the month) it would be fair to say I spent the following 4 weeks in a mildly inebriated state during which writing my name would have been a struggle much less penning this blog.

The fact we did a bit of travelling around is a more innocent and probably more accurate reason as to why I have neglected DOAFH for this long as we spent time in Perth, Kalbarri and a very memorable couple of nights in Port Gregory with our good friends Sam and Tim Hay who run the caravan park there. While I will explore in a bit more detail some of the goings on during this time, which by way of a preview included a memorable fishing trip with KK and Kissa, I will move onto what I think is the real reason for my two month writer’s block.

It was at a good friend’s 50th that Wifey and I found ourselves in a very interesting conversation with a couple who farm an adjoining property to Mulga Springs. As you would expect we were talking about what kind of year it had been on the respective properties and the simple fact that when you farm it is an all consuming and often overwhelming undertaking that at times leaves you with nowhere to hide and no option to get away from it all when things aren’t going to plan.

This exchange got me thinking about sayings like “you shouldn’t bring your work home with you” and “as soon as I leave the office I shut off from work” and that anyone invested in a farming business whether it is financially, emotionally or physically rarely gets the chance to put enough distance between them and their property to wind down sufficiently to really relax. You quite literally ‘live the business’ when you are in farming and if I am to be honest this to my mind is the real reason I haven’t blogged for over two months as for the first time since I met Wifey I needed a break from Mulga Springs.

Now those of you who know me are probably thinking “Is he serious, he doesn’t spend that much time working on the farm” and you would be absolutely right however Wifey does spend that much time working at Mulga Springs and as all the farmer’s wives out there can attest to there does come a point when you can see your family needs to physically remove themselves to unwind and recharge the batteries even if it is just for a few days.

In our part of the world it is places like Port Gregory, Kalbarri or my personal favourite Horrocks that offer solace to farming families through late December and January. We are fortunate to have the use of Kissa and MIL’s camp in Horrocks which over the years has been the venue for some cracking New Year’s Eves and more recently very special family gatherings with ZASH and their cousins.

I on occasion tell the story that while I was certain I would marry Wifey soon after meeting her my first visit to Horrocks and the family’s ‘beach camp’ (which is inactual fact a very serviceable 2x1chalet) sealed the deal.Idyllic when there is no wind and with that perpetual holiday atmosphere which makes it ok to open a beer at anytime of the day it is probably the only place (other than the header when the crop is going 3 tonne*) that I see Kissa totally relaxed.

While there is a school of thought that with so many farmers congregating in Horrocks surely the only thing discussed is farming however I can tell you that is not the case. In my experience it remains the most conducive location to bring the conversation away from the farm due quite simply to the fact you are not able to see the fence line you have been meaning to fix or the two mobs of sheep you were going to move to better pasture.

I mentioned earlier that I spent a reasonable amount of my holiday partaking in some social ales around the place and while Wifey achieved nowhere near my level of consumption there were some occasions where Rins performed admirably her second most important role (other than looking after ZCP and ASH) of driving us home. Now I thought this would be viewed as quite a mundane task for our super efficient, effervescent 18 y.o. although apparently not according to our ever positive uber au pair who insisted Wifey sledge me mercilessly whenever I started singing along to the radio, most notably the cover of the Bob Geldof inspired “Do they know it’s Christmas?” was highly entertaining.

* 3 tonnes of crop harvested from every hectare seeded

Owing to the fact if I don’t post this now I probably never will I’ll let the photo gallery tell the story of our last couple of months.

Picture

Movember with ASH (day before I shaved it off, Wifey was pleased)

To be honest I really can’t put my finger on why it is taken so long for me to write this post although I have come up with several theories.

My first one revolved around the fact I had almost a month off work and having had a ‘Mo/No’vember (combination of growing, well trying to at least, a moustache and drinking ‘No’ alcohol for the month) it would be fair to say I spent the following 4 weeks in a mildly inebriated state during which writing my name would have been a struggle much less penning this blog.

The fact we did a bit of travelling around is a more innocent and probably more accurate reason as to why I have neglected DOAFH for this long as we spent time in Perth, Kalbarri and a very memorable couple of nights in Port Gregory with our good friends Sam and Tim Hay who run the caravan park there. While I will explore in a bit more detail some of the goings on during this time, which by way of a preview included a memorable fishing trip with KK and Kissa, I will move onto what I think is the real reason for my two month writer’s block.

It was at a good friend’s 50th that Wifey and I found ourselves in a very interesting conversation with a couple who farm an adjoining property to Mulga Springs. As you would expect we were talking about what kind of year it had been on the respective properties and the simple fact that when you farm it is an all consuming and often overwhelming undertaking that at times leaves you with nowhere to hide and no option to get away from it all when things aren’t going to plan.

This exchange got me thinking about sayings like “you shouldn’t bring your work home with you” and “as soon as I leave the office I shut off from work” and that anyone invested in a farming business whether it is financially, emotionally or physically rarely gets the chance to put enough distance between them and their property to wind down sufficiently to really relax. You quite literally ‘live the business’ when you are in farming and if I am to be honest this to my mind is the real reason I haven’t blogged for over two months as for the first time since I met Wifey I needed a break from Mulga Springs.

Now those of you who know me are probably thinking “Is he serious, he doesn’t spend that much time working on the farm” and you would be absolutely right however Wifey does spend that much time working at Mulga Springs and as all the farmer’s wives out there can attest to there does come a point when you can see your family needs to physically remove themselves to unwind and recharge the batteries even if it is just for a few days.

In our part of the world it is places like Port Gregory, Kalbarri or my personal favourite Horrocks that offer solace to farming families through late December and January. We are fortunate to have the use of Kissa and MIL’s camp in Horrocks which over the years has been the venue for some cracking New Year’s Eves and more recently very special family gatherings with ZASH and their cousins.

I on occasion tell the story that while I was certain I would marry Wifey soon after meeting her my first visit to Horrocks and the family’s ‘beach camp’ (which is inactual fact a very serviceable 2x1chalet) sealed the deal.Idyllic when there is no wind and with that perpetual holiday atmosphere which makes it ok to open a beer at anytime of the day it is probably the only place (other than the header when the crop is going 3 tonne*) that I see Kissa totally relaxed.

While there is a school of thought that with so many farmers congregating in Horrocks surely the only thing discussed is farming however I can tell you that is not the case. In my experience it remains the most conducive location to bring the conversation away from the farm due quite simply to the fact you are not able to see the fence line you have been meaning to fix or the two mobs of sheep you were going to move to better pasture.

I mentioned earlier that I spent a reasonable amount of my holiday partaking in some social ales around the place and while Wifey achieved nowhere near my level of consumption there were some occasions where Rins performed admirably her second most important role (other than looking after ZCP and ASH) of driving us home. Now I thought this would be viewed as quite a mundane task for our super efficient, effervescent 18 y.o. although apparently not according to our ever positive uber au pair who insisted Wifey sledge me mercilessly whenever I started singing along to the radio, most notably the cover of the Bob Geldof inspired “Do they know it’s Christmas?” was highly entertaining.

* 3 tonnes of crop harvested from every hectare seeded

Owing to the fact if I don’t post this now I probably never will I’ll let the photo gallery tell the story of our last couple of months.

Picture

‘Go Bananas’ and ‘Flip Out’ (video) in Perth, my Sister-in-law and I did these venues back to back. We liked the idea of kids being caged in…

Picture

Hopman Cup in Perth, we saw Eugenie Borchards play… My brother’s comment “Even her shadow is hot” will go down in history.

Picture

Magic morning in Port Gregory

Picture

Lads fishing trip. The fact there is no other photos of the trip speaks to how many fish we caught….

Picture

Dinner at the ‘Restaurant Upstairs’ in Kalbarri, coldest Coronas in the Central West.

Picture

Pink Lake at Port Gregory

Picture

Having a beer with ZASH in Port Gregory, don’t worry the kids only had mid strength.

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